Filmmaker Guillermo del Toro (detailed topic in Instructions)

Filmmaker Guillermo del Toro (detailed topic in Instructions)

Since this is a RESEARCH PAPER, please use scholar’s insights on both the director and two films I have decided to write on: The Pan’s Labyrinth and The Devil’s Backbone. THE FILE LABELLED DBT means that are started to write the research paper but need additional assistance to make it an overall strong paper. I have included exactly what I need help with the DBT paper. I have also included a MS Word document labelled Cinematic Techniques which includes a WEBSITE LINK to various books, to use film scholar’s analysis of how the filmmaker Guillermo del Toro uses camera angles and mis en scene in the 2 films I have selected. The films I have selected are Pan’s Labyrinth and The Devil’s Backbone.

Instructions
Research Paper (Total 10-12 pages).
The paper should include: Please note that I would prefer the Writer to find additional sources to cite when writing the paper and read instructions carefully. I have included a Microsoft Word attachment labeled Cinematic Techniques with definitions of camera positioning, mis en scene, summary of the plot for both films, and how both films utilize camera positions and a Microsoft PowerPoint presentation to give you a visual of both films and a Microsoft Word attachment with the typed out essay which I will need the Writer to rephrase/rewrite to avoid plagiarism since I copied and paste it. I will need the Writer to provide a strong introduction, body and write a conclusion an overall excellent research paper.
a)  TOPIC:  Analyze a filmmaker Guillermo del Toro that is known for paying very close attention to mise-en-scène and camera work. Discuss these in two of his films. How do camera and mise-en-scène complement the story in Pan’s Labyrinth and The Devil’s Backbone?
b)      Include a separate (first) 1-page plot summary of the films you mention in your paper,
c)      Include a separate (last) 1-page reference list
d)      Please include an abstract. No need to be on a separate page
e)      Use at least 10 references. At least 7 need to be outside academic research. You can use the textbook, and each chapter counts as 1 reference.
f)        The main text (not including abstract) should be 8-10 pages.
g)        The bibliography should be in APA style.
h)      Regarding in-text citations, please see below requirement: should include author and year, and page number if you cite quotes. For example: (Jackson, 2011, p. 24).
j) In order to check whether or not your references are correct, I have a rule that falls outside of APA style. For in-text citations, even if you are not quoting the text, please indicate the page number and the number of the paragraph on that page. If the page has two columns, please indicate the Right or Left column, and the # of the paragraph. For example, if it is from Johnson (2014), on page 16, in the right column, the 2nd paragraph, you should indicate: Johnson, 2014, P.16, R2.

Since this is a RESEARCH PAPER, please use scholar’s insights on both the director and two films I have decided to write on: The Pan’s Labyrinth and The Devil’s Backbone. THE FILE LABELLED DBT means that are started to write the research paper but need additional assistance to make it an overall strong paper. I have included exactly what I need help with the DBT paper. I have also included a MS Word document labelled Cinematic Techniques which includes a WEBSITE LINK to various books, to use film scholar’s analysis of how the filmmaker Guillermo del Toro uses camera angles and mis en scene in the 2 films I have selected. The films I have selected are Pan’s Labyrinth and The Devil’s Backbone.

 

Instructions

Research Paper (Total 10-12 pages).

The paper should include: Please note that I would prefer the Writer to find additional sources to cite when writing the paper and read instructions carefully. I have included a Microsoft Word attachment labeled Cinematic Techniques with definitions of camera positioning, mis en scene, summary of the plot for both films, and how both films utilize camera positions and a Microsoft PowerPoint presentation to give you a visual of both films and a Microsoft Word attachment with the typed out essay which I will need the Writer to rephrase/rewrite to avoid plagiarism since I copied and paste it. I will need the Writer to provide a strong introduction, body and write a conclusion an overall excellent research paper.

  1. a) TOPIC: Analyze a filmmaker Guillermo del Toro that is known for paying very close attention to mise-en-scène and camera work. Discuss these in two of his films. How do camera and mise-en-scène complement the story in Pan’s Labyrinth and The Devil’s Backbone?
  2. b) Include a separate (first) 1-page plot summary of the films you mention in your paper,
  3. c) Include a separate (last) 1-page reference list
  4. d) Please include an abstract. No need to be on a separate page
  5. e) Use at least 10 references. At least 7 need to be outside academic research. You can use the textbook, and each chapter counts as 1 reference.
  6. f) The main text (not including abstract) should be 8-10 pages.
  7. g) The bibliography should be in APA style.
  8. h) Regarding in-text citations, please see below requirement: should include author and year, and page number if you cite quotes. For example: (Jackson, 2011, p. 24).
  9. j) In order to check whether or not your references are correct, I have a rule that falls outside of APA style. For in-text citations, even if you are not quoting the text, please indicate the page number and the number of the paragraph on that page. If the page has two columns, please indicate the Right or Left column, and the # of the paragraph. For example, if it is from Johnson (2014), on page 16, in the right column, the 2nd paragraph, you should indicate: Johnson, 2014, P.16, R2.
  1. PLEASE review the definition of Mise en scene and Camera Positioning to understand how to write the paper
  2. Please note I have included the Camera Positioning for Pan’s Labyrinth and The Devil’s Backbone below. Please incorporate the information for each film in the essay.

CINEMATIC TECHNIQUES

Mise en scène: French term for “what is put into the scene” or in film the shot. It refers to the composition and organization of what is placed within the frame: sets, lighting, costumes, props, characters included within a scene and their positions, and even acting styles.

 

CAMERA POSITIONING, ANGLES, AND SHOTS

Camera angle: the point of view (POV) or perspective (including relative height or direction) chosen from which to photograph a subject. Various camera angles, compositions, or positions include: front, behind, side, top, high (looking down), low (looking up), straight-on or eye-level (standard or neutral angle), etc. Establishing shot: usually a long (wide-angle or full) shot at the beginning of a scene (or a sequence) that is intended to show things from a distance (often an aerial shot), and to inform the audience with an overview in order to help identify and orient the locale or time for the scene and action that follows

CAMERA POSITIONING, ANGLES, AND SHOTS in Pan’s Labyrinth

LINK HERE TO REVIEW INFORMATION: https://filmquarterly.org/2007/06/01/pans-labyrinth/

I started to copy and paste the information here:

 

Pan’s Labyrinth begins with a blank, black screen. We hear the sound of feverish panting and the humming of Javier Navarrete’s haunting theme. Titles briefly set the scene: it is Spain in 1944 and guerrillas are holding out in the woods against the triumphant Franco regime. In close-up we see the source of the labored breathing: as time runs backwards, a trickle of ruby-red blood retreats into the nostril of white-faced, black-haired Ofelia, the child protagonist played by extraordinary newcomer Ivana Baquero. Cinematographer Guillermo Navarro’s camera, already restlessly mobile, plunges into her eye and the first fantasy sequence. The voiceover tells the ancient legend of a Princess, exiled from her underground realm, who will return to be with her father the King when she finds a portal to her lost home. The tiny figure of the Princess (Ofelia) descends the staircases of a vast fantasy set.

The screen flares up to white and the camera swoops over bombed buildings. A wide shot of a ruined bell tower shows the famously devastated village of Belchite, a drawing of which appeared on the cover of the Francoist magazine Reconstrucciónas early as 1940. (The village, an uncanny tourist attraction, remains ruinous even today.) Ofelia and her sickly pregnant mother (the convincingly distressed Carmen) are traveling by official car (a Fascist symbol is prominently painted on its side) to a remote outpost. Here the girl will meet her repellent stepfather (Captain Vidal), a Francoist captain sent to fight the guerrillas. As mother Carmen stops the car to vomit by the road, daughter Ofelia comes face to face with a stele carved with a mysterious figure and replaces a piece of the carving she has found on the forest floor. She is rewarded with her first glimpse of this magical place’s genius loci: a chattering stick insect she identifies as a “fairy.” Soaring behind the buzzing beast, the camera follows it and the car to the new family’s fateful meeting at the decrepit mill that serves as the Francoist military headquarters.

 

CAMERA POSITIONING, ANGLES, AND SHOTS in THE DEVIL’S BACKBONE

Book link here: https://books.google.com/books?id=4kq7CQAAQBAJ&pg=PA62&lpg=PA62&dq=The+narration+and+the+composition+of+shots+used+by+del+Toro+at+the+start+and+end+of+The+Devil%E2%80%99s+Backbone+mirror+each+other.+In+the+first+shot+of+Casares+he+is+tightly+framed+within+a+window+looking+out+at+the+antics+of+the+boys+in+the+courtyard,+his+face+partly+eclipsed+in+dark+shadow.+At+the+end+of+the+film,+he+is+framed&source=bl&ots=Oyrni3kA5_&sig=h-kWuLeoMGmIHIL-vrbPK8f17u0&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjY0O_ev7jaAhWBct8KHQfsBRIQ6AEIJzAA#v=onepage&q=The%20narration%20and%20the%20composition%20of%20shots%20used%20by%20del%20Toro%20at%20the%20start%20and%20end%20of%20The%20Devil%E2%80%99s%20Backbone%20mirror%20each%20other.%20In%20the%20first%20shot%20of%20Casares%20he%20is%20tightly%20framed%20within%20a%20window%20looking%20out%20at%20the%20antics%20of%20the%20boys%20in%20the%20courtyard%2C%20his%20face%20partly%20eclipsed%20in%20dark%20shadow.%20At%20the%20end%20of%20the%20film%2C%20he%20is%20framed&f=false

I started to copy and paste the information here:

The narration and the composition of shots used by del Toro at the start and end of The Devil’s Backbone mirror each other. In the first shot of Casares he is tightly framed within a window looking out at the antics of the boys in the courtyard, his face partly eclipsed in dark shadow. At the end of the film, he is framed in the open doorway of the orphanage completely silhouetted against the stark sun-drenched landscape outside. The camera’s point of view is behind him. Del Toro called The Devil’s Backbone a Gothic Western and in the final shot the allusion to the Western genre is at its most potent and poignant, the shot directly. The archway into the cellar of the orphanage is pictured during the opening narration on the nature of ghosts. It is a doorway to the discovery of a supernatural world; through doorways other world wait and can be glimpsed.  Every horror film needs it major scare. What del Toro considered his “Hitchcock moment” comes when Carlos, forced into a pantry by the approaching specter of Santi, peaks through the lock on the door only to witness the yellow eye of the ghost suddenly appear. The doorway functions as a physical and metaphysical boundary. When the boys seem to be trapped in the storeroom and faced with certain death at the hands of Jacinto the doors are unlocked. We hear the faint buzzing of flies on the soundtrack and see them outside the door on the ground, the injured boy then tells us that Casares unlocked the door, despite the fact that we have already witnessed his death.  Doors, gateways, and boundaries have for centuries, been connected to supernatural activity, offering a link between this world and another-they are heavily utilized in this way by del Toro in this and his other films involving the supernatural.

 

At the end of the film Santi’s ghost is not liberated by the destruction of his murderer. In a chilling shot we see him framed in the arch of the –he stares directly at the camera hovering above the pool of water in which his body lies. Remember me. The orphanage, like Spain itself is still haunted by the death of innocents. Santi’s body like those in the war’s mass graves has not been given proper burial; it has not been laid to rest. As the boys leave the site of Santi’s death at the end of the film, del Toro fades them from the image as if they too have become spirits.

 

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