This assignment focuses on the close reading of one story in order to analyze on

This assignment focuses on the close reading of one story in order to analyze one character. Choose one of the following characters to analyze: Connie from “Where are you going, where have you
been?,” Delia from “Sweat,” or Lyman from “The Red Convertible.”
To prepare for this assignment:
1. Re-read the short story you have chosen, highlighting sections of the story that will help you
prove your points about the character you are analyzing.
2. Read Chapter 5 in our textbook about fictional elements, particularly character.
3. Read the document in this folder called “How to write a character analysis” –you will not be
able to complete this assignment unless you follow the step-by-step guidelines in this
document! This is the key to your success with this assignment!
4. This essay should be 3-4 pages, double-spaced, with a Works Cited page at the end.
A good character analysis is organized this way:
1. Section A, first paragraph: identify the kind of character you are writing about (protagonist,
antagonist, dynamic – see attached document for explanations. Be sure to provide specific examples
from the story to prove your ideas). All of these characters are dynamic.
2. Section B, next several paragraphs: describe the character (see attached document for ideas, “How
to Write a Character Analysis). You want to spend at least two-three paragraphs discussing how this
character becomes dynamic. See the “How To” document for a detailed discussion.
3. Section C: identify and discuss the conflict in the story as it relates to the character you have
chosen (see the attached document for a review of standard conflicts in literature).
THE RED CONVERTIBLE
Main content
In “The Red Convertible,” Erdrich uses symbolism in a variety of ways. The most important symbol is the title car, the significance of which changes as the story unfolds. Erdrich’s use of symbolism in this way gives her story depth and complexity and enables her to communicate ideas and character developments without lengthy explanations. As a result, the red convertible embodies, at various points in the story, everything the story is meant to express.
Fraternal bonds, freedom, innocence, control, and wisdom–all of these themes are carried by one red convertible.
Perhaps the convertible’s greatest contribution to the story is as a symbol of the relationship between Lyman and Henry. Initially, it represents their close companionship. They bought it together on a whim, which demonstrates their willingness to share a major responsibility and to do so on impulse. After buying it, they took a summer-long road trip together. The decision to take the trip was mutual, and their unplanned approach to the trip also was mutual. That they enjoyed the extended trip shows that they were close and genuinely enjoyed each other’s company.
The convertible symbolizes the brothers’ reaching out to each other. Before leaving for Vietnam, Henry used the car to reach out to Lyman. He told Lyman to take the car, and he handed over his key. After returning from the war, Henry was emotionally distant, but again he tried to give Lyman full ownership of the car. These are significant episodes in the story because they reveal Henry’s love for Lyman. As a Chippewa, Henry learned to be reserved in expressing his feelings; his culture expected men to refrain from emotional displays. Because of this, he would not tell his brother outright that he loved him, wanted him to be independent, or feared that he (Henry) might not return from the war. Instead, he expressed these feelings by offering the car to his brother.
Lyman used the car as a means to reach out to Henry. When Henry returned from the war moody, detached, and silent, Lyman intentionally damaged the car to get Henry involved in something. When Henry saw the condition of the car, he said to Lyman, “When I left, that car was running like a watch. Now I don’t know if I can get it to start again, let alone get it anywhere near its old condition.” Henry’s statement is deeply significant when read in light of the car’s dual meaning. Lyman’s decision to damage the convertible was important because he saw the car as his brother’s only chance of regaining his sense of self. When Lyman damaged the car, cosmetically and mechanically, he demonstrated his willingness to risk not only a prized possession but also his relationship with his brother (symbolized by the car) for his brother’s happiness. The changing physical condition of the car is also symbolic of the relationship of the brothers because it reflects the status of their brotherly closeness.
Besides symbolizing the complex relationship between Lyman and Henry, the convertible represents other aspects of the characters’ inner worlds. During the summer road trip, it represented freedom. At the time, Lyman was only sixteen, an age at which most young people long to explore the world and to make their own decisions. Together, Lyman and Henry used the car to leave the reservation where they lived and to see what was beyond its borders.
The convertible also symbolizes the carefree, innocent life that precedes Henry’s three years in Vietnam. Lyman and Henry traveled without care or worry, enjoying whatever experiences came their way. When Henry prepared to leave for Vietnam, he gave Lyman his key to the car. Henry likely realized that by going to Vietnam, he was sacrificing his innocence. Lyman, however, could still enjoy being carefree, so, by giving Lyman his key, Henry was encouraging him to embrace his last innocent years. At the end of the story, Henry dies in the river, and Lyman runs the car in after him. This is a highly symbolic moment because it represents the end of Lyman’s innocence as well as the end of the brothers’ relationship. The car had no meaning for him after his brother was gone, and he had learned too much about the world to feel carefree again.
The car represents as well a much-needed outlet for Henry after the war. When he came home, he was unable to function as he had in the past. After Lyman damaged the car, Henry had the opportunity to work toward a goal, instead of watching television all day. In this way, the car symbolizes Henry’s need for a sense of purpose and mastery. He did not know how to be a member of his family or community, but he did know how to fix the car. Fixing the car seems to have lifted his spirits because it was familiar and something that allowed him to feel useful and competent for a while.
“The Red Convertible” is a seemingly simple story, but the changing symbolism of the car gives it richness and depth. In describing metaphors, scholars often use the terms vehicle and tenor. The vehicle is the image used to communicate meaning (the tenor) to the reader. Applying this terminology to the convertible in Erdrich’s story, the reader finds numerous tenors revealed through one literal vehicle. Fraternal bonds, freedom, innocence, control, and wisdom–all of these themes are carried by one red convertible.
Full Text: COPYRIGHT 2002 The Gale Group, COPYRIGHT 2007 Gale
Source Citation
Source Citation
MLA 9th Edition APA 7th Edition Chicago 17th Edition Harvard
Bussey, Jennifer. “Critical Essay on ‘The Red Convertible’.” Short Stories for Students, edited by Jennifer Smith, vol. 14, Gale, 2002. Gale Literature Resource Center, link.gale.com/apps/doc/H1420040746/LitRC?u=mlin_c_wachcc&sid=ebsco&xid=155f6bd8. Accessed 15 Nov. 2021.
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Consider the ways in which the history of settler colonialist society, its ideol

Consider the ways in which the history of settler colonialist society, its ideologies, beliefs, values, language, and ways of knowing, shape the manner in which social work is currently practiced.
1. How do they contribute to the experiences of service users as they interface within the system you have chosen to write about?
2. How might they have shaped the meaning that service users place on their own circumstances, identities, etc.?
3. How do they inform how you, as the practitioner, utilize your power and positionality in the processes of assessment, engagement, and intervention?
4. What are some of the strategies for dismantling these types of thoughts, policies, and practices?
5. What are some alternative, decolonized thoughts, policies, and practices and the possibilities that might emerge from these shifts?
This semester, you are responsible for submitting:
• A working title for your contribution (you can change the title in the spring)
• A literature review identifying the sources you are using to contextualize and support the new theories, practices, and policies you are presenting (sources can include articles, artwork, poetry, photographs, music, and other indigenous/folkways of knowing)
• A 200 word abstract of your contribution

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https://www.soarnorthcountry.com/images/upload/sweat-zora-neale-hurston.pdf This

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This week, we will examine characters in more depth as we read the short story, “Sweat” by Zora Neale Hurston. To prepare, you want to skim the articles in the Week 6 folder that discuss characters in literature, as well as dynamic characters, and then answer the questions below.
1. Read the definition of a dynamic character. Then take a position: is Delia a dynamic character? Do you feel that she changes internally, deep within herself, by the end of the story? Tell us which side you are taking and then bring in specific evidence to prove your point. Remember, to prove that a character is dynamic, you must show us what she was like in the beginning, what happened to make her change, and how she actually acts different. If you feel that Delia is not a dynamic character, you still must provide this same kind of analysis and discussion: how is she at the beginning of the story, how does she react to conflict without changing internally, and how do you know at the end that she has not changed internally?
2. Read the definition of a “foil” character in the Week 6 folder and then explain how Sykes is a foil to Delia, bringing in specific examples to prove your points.

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https://www.cusd200.org/cms/lib/IL01001538/Centricity/Domain/361/oates_going.pdf

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Please read story above
Your Assignment:
1. Click into the Weekly Assignment folder for Week 5 and open the document called “Quotes to use for this week.” You will find a selection of quotes from the short story assigned for this week. Choose TWO quotes.
2. Briefly summarize the meaning of the quote and explain what is happening at this point in the story — very briefly.
3. Break parts of the quote down and discuss these parts. Why is this quote important in the story? For example, here are a few ideas of how quotes can help a story:
a. Sometimes a quote helps to develop the protagonist, or central character, by revealing more about her character or developing her character, showing growth or change
b. A quote might represent one of the elements of plot, such as the climactic moment or the denouement. See the list in the Weekly folder.
c. A quote might build tension or add conflict to the plot that impacts the protagonist
d. A quote can establish setting
e. A quote can reveal how the protagonist gets along with other characters, which tells us a lot about the protagonist’s personality
f. A quote might use figurative language (metaphor, personification, simile, etc.) to emphasize an idea or image.
Add the analysis—-identify why the quote is important but be sure to tell us why.

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http://professorolivas.weebly.com/uploads/1/3/5/5/13552924/lynnnottage–poof_.pd

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Read the drama above
Your assignment:
1. In reading the elements of drama in this week’s folder, you will see a term called “spectacle,” which is similar to the idea of a prop on the stage. Take a moment and visualize this play. Think about ONE object on the set that you feel is meaningful in this play—maybe the play would lose something if that spectacle was removed from the stage. Tell us what this object is and tell us why it is so important to the play.
2. In the Weekly Assignment folder for Week 4, read about conflict in literature. Think about ONE non-human antagonist that creates conflict for the protagonist, Loureen. So don’t choose her husband and don’t choose her friend. Choose an object, an idea, a value, the time period, a physical structure, a symbol, an aspect of our culture—something that is non-human that creates tension within Loureen and causes conflict for her. Tell us what you have chosen and then bring in proof to show that Loureen gets upset by this—show us the evidence in the play that demonstrates this non-antagonist actually does create conflict for her.

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You will find different performances of Samuel Beckett’s Krapp’s Last Tape, Play

You will find different performances of Samuel Beckett’s Krapp’s Last Tape, Play, and Not I on Youtube, in particular the Channel 4 productions of these play.. View them and read them, and write your brief responses to them.
2. Read NOT I (uploaded document) and write your interpretation on it, theme language, imagery etc..
3.your Own interpretation meaning of them

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Unit 5 DB: Convince us of your conflict Initial Response: Jackson, Dick, and Atw

Unit 5 DB: Convince us of your conflict
Initial Response: Jackson, Dick, and Atwood brilliantly incorporate the conflict of Man vs. Society, but which one does it better?
In one to two paragraphs, argue which of the Unit 5 authors best portrays the conflict of Man vs. Society and HOW (you might like to do some more research on The Handmaid’s Tale to write about Atwood). This is a great practice for your upcoming Position Paper.
Share a modern-day piece of literature (new story, article, video, movie, novel, etc.) that supports your response and is a direct connection to the story you choose. Be sure to post the link to your modern piece of literature and explain how it connects to your chosen author/story.
Finish your post by asking a question of your peers that promotes critical thinking on this subject.
here are the links to the two videos

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“Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night” Do not go gentle into that good night, O

“Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night”
Do not go gentle into that good night,
Old age should burn and rage at close of day;
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.
Though wise men at their end know dark is right,
Because their words had forked no lightning they
Do not go gentle into that good night.
Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright
Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light
Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight,
And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way,
Do not go gentle into that good night.
Grave men, near death, who see the blinding sight
Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.
And you, my father, there on the sad height,
Curse, bless me now with your fierce tears, I pray.
Do not go gentle into that good night.
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.
By Dylan Thomas (1914 – 1953)
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“Psalm of Life”
Tell me not, in mournful numbers,
Life is but an empty dream! –
For the soul is dead that slumbers,
And things are not what they seem.
Life is real! Life is earnest!
And the grave is not its goal;
Dust thou art, to dust returnest,
Was not spoken of the soul.
Not enjoyment, and not sorrow,
Is our destined end or way;
But to act, that each to-morrow
Find us farther than to-day.
Art is long, and Time is fleeting,
And our hearts, though stout and brave,
Still, like muffled drums, are beating
Funeral marches to the grave.
In the world’s broad field of battle,
In the bivouac of Life,
Be not like dumb, driven cattle!
Be a hero in the strife!
Trust no Future, howe’er pleasant!
Let the dead Past bury its dead!
Act,–act in the living Present!
Heart within, and God o’erhead!
Lives of great men all remind us
We can make our lives sublime,
And, departing, leave behind us
Footprints on the sands of time;
Footprints, that perhaps another,
Sailing o’er life’s solemn main,
A forlorn and shipwrecked brother,
Seeing, shall take heart again.
Let us, then, be up and doing,
With a heart for any fate;
Still achieving, still pursuing,
Learn to labor and to wait.
By Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807 – 1882)
You will write a literary analysis paper on the poems. In your essay, you will present both comparisons (similarities) and differences (contrasts) of the authors’ development of the themes of life and death. Be sure to analyze tone, metaphor, simile, diction, style, and most importantly, the core meaning of the selections.
Criteria for This Assignment
Length and Formatting Requirements
One to three pages (750 to 1200 words), double spaced
Times New Roman, 12-point font
Content Requirements
Develop your topic and argument logically and cohesively.
Your thesis should drive the content of your essay.
State specific examples of the literary techniques in your essay (for example, don’t just say the author uses a rhyme pattern to convey his message; be specific about how and why.)

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MUST be in MLA format. The good thing about this is that your bibliography is o

MUST be in MLA format. The good thing about this is that your bibliography is only one source-the text of
Hamlet that is online. You may not use normal language. You must have Shakespearean language within your paper. Also, there has to be text evidence on the paper. I have attached a pdf of a guide that my professor uploaded for us. This essay is on hamlet. It has to be a topic from the play that can be argued.

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How is the quarantine of Oran in Camus’ novel similar to the quarantine we have

How is the quarantine of Oran in Camus’ novel similar to the quarantine we have experienced during the COVID crisis? How is it different? Write a 400-word response. In your initial posting, provide at least three quotations from the novel in MLA format.

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