Affirmative Action. Should universities or employers preferentially select candidates on the basis of race, ethnicity, sex, or other demographic factors?

Please write a paper in which you examine different positions and arguments on an issue, before giving your own position and arguments.
Issue:
Affirmative Action. Should universities or employers preferentially select candidates on the basis of race, ethnicity, sex, or other demographic factors?
Position: Universities/employers should preferentially select candidates on the basis of race, ethnicity, or sex, or other demographic factors.
******required source: https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/affirmative-action/
******additional sources:
https://www.amacad.org/publication/asian-americans-affirmative-action-rise-anti-asian-hate

Click to access Racial-Quotas-Weights-and-Real-Possibilities.pdf


*discuss moral principles and factual information
1. Issue and Survey of Positions and Arguments  (~400 words)
2. Your Position and Main Arguments (~200 words)
3. Your Developed Arguments (~400 words)
4. Objections to Your Arguments (~200 words)
5. Detailed Objections to Your Arguments (~400 words)
6. Your Rebuttals (~200 words)
Detailed Instructions for Each Section of the Project:
1. Issue and Survey of Positions and Arguments
a. State your issue as a single question, and then briefly explain the issue, why it is important, and why people have disagreed about it.
b. Using the required source by Robert Fullinwider, list and briefly explain at least 2 positions that people have argued for on your issue.
A position is an answer to the specific question that constitutes the issue. Present and explain positions that are plausible, popular, or both. State each position as a single statement.
Tip: Don’t confuse a position with an argument for the position. A position is a single statement that answers an issue. An argument is one or more statements that together try to prove that a position is true.
c. Using the required source, write the most important arguments that have been given for each position. Include at least 2 arguments for each position.
An argument is one or more sentences that together attempt to prove that a position is true.
Tip: Don’t combine separate arguments. Arguments are separate when they provide logically independent reasons in support of the position.
In explaining arguments, present background information necessary to understand and evaluate them. This includes defining key terms and explaining key moral principles used in the arguments, and presenting factual information relevant to the truth of the premises used in the arguments.
For example, if your issue were “Is abortion ever morally permissible?”, then relevant background information includes definitions of terms such as ‘abortion’, ‘fetus’, and ‘moral person’, and explanations of moral principles such as the right to life. Include parenthetical citations for the sources of the background information (Author last name + page #).
2. Your Position and Main Arguments
a. State your position on the issue you’ve chosen.
State the position clearly in a single sentence. It’s okay if you have a nuanced position that combines elements of different positions, but the position must be logically consistent and stated clearly and precisely.
b. Beneath your position, state at least 2 main arguments in support of your position.
Each argument should be 2 to 5 premises in length. The conclusion of each of your arguments should be your position (or one part of your position). The arguments must be logically consistent with each other.
For each argument, make it clear what the main premises (assumptions) of your argument are. The main premises are the key factual claims and moral principles that work together to support your conclusion.
Cite sources for your arguments (if any) using MLA format.
Tip: The conclusion of each of your arguments should be your position—since that is the claim that you’re arguing for.
3. Your Developed Arguments
Develop your main arguments by providing further reasons (premises) in support of the main premises.
Main premises are the premises that directly support your conclusion. Give arguments for key factual claims or moral principles that are controversial or about which your audience may not be informed.
Cite sources that support your argument using MLA format.
4. Objections to Your Arguments
Present at least 2 important objections—at least 1 objection to each of your arguments.
An objection is a counter-argument that tries to prove that one of your arguments is logically flawed (because it is invalid or weak) or that it has a false premise. The objections could be ones that you have read in a source, or they could be ones that you came up with on your own.
Cite sources of or evidence for the objections using MLA format.
5. Developed Objections to Your Arguments
Develop the objections you raised in the previous assignment by explaining their main premises or key terms and giving additional premises in support of their key factual claims or moral principles.
Cite sources of or evidence for the objections using MLA format.
6. Your Rebuttals
Give at least 2 rebuttals, one to each developed objection you raised in section 5.
A rebuttal is a counter-argument that tries to refute an objection by showing that it is logically flawed or has a false premise.

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