Marketing Plan Stage of the Product life cycle of Plant-Based Meat Pizza: Marketing Assignment, OC

ASSIGNMENT

Marketing Plan

1. Stage of the product life cycle – plant-based meat pizza

2.Marketing mix

a. Product/service

Type

good,

service,

the idea, etc

Features – how will it be different from the competitors?

Identification – brand name, label, and packaging

Production method/delivery of service

b. Price – Pricing strategy

Profit-oriented

Sales-oriented

Status quo

c. Place

Channels of distribution

manufacturer

wholesaler,

retailer

Product location availability –

Physical distribution/location of facilities/modes of transportation

Cost

Production

Distribution

Overhead

Sales

Marketing

Markup

Suggested selling price

Profit margin

Price and quality relationship

perceived value

d. Promotion

Personal selling

Advertising

Direct mail

Internet

website, social media, email, etc

Telemarketing

Television

Radio

Integrated media

Others

Sales promotions

sales prices, discounts, coupons, contests, sweepstakes, tradeshows, etc

Public relations – Website

3. Budget – for the project is $ 250,000 Make a timeline and financial spendings

4. Control/monitor

Feedback mechanism to monitor progress

Evaluation process

Performance objectives (quantifiable elements)

Profit margin

Market share

promotional effectiveness

Market penetration

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Marketing Plan Stage of the Product life cycle of Plant-Based Meat Pizza: Marketing Assignment, OC

ASSIGNMENT

Marketing Plan

1. Stage of the product life cycle – plant-based meat pizza

2.Marketing mix

a. Product/service

Type

good,

service,

the idea, etc

Features – how will it be different from the competitors?

Identification – brand name, label, and packaging

Production method/delivery of service

b. Price – Pricing strategy

Profit-oriented

Sales-oriented

Status quo

c. Place

Channels of distribution

manufacturer

wholesaler,

retailer

Product location availability –

Physical distribution/location of facilities/modes of transportation

Cost

Production

Distribution

Overhead

Sales

Marketing

Markup

Suggested selling price

Profit margin

Price and quality relationship

perceived value

d. Promotion

Personal selling

Advertising

Direct mail

Internet

website, social media, email, etc

Telemarketing

Television

Radio

Integrated media

Others

Sales promotions

sales prices, discounts, coupons, contests, sweepstakes, tradeshows, etc

Public relations – Website

3. Budget – for the project is $ 250,000 Make a timeline and financial spendings

4. Control/monitor

Feedback mechanism to monitor progress

Evaluation process

Performance objectives (quantifiable elements)

Profit margin

Market share

promotional effectiveness

Market penetration

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Developing an Anti-Corruption Program: Investigations Assignment, UNH, US

ASSIGNMENT

Discussion: Developing an Anti-Corruption Program

One of the keys to mitigating bribery and corruption risk is to have policy, procedures, and controls in place to detect and deter corruption. To be able to develop the right procedures and controls to address this risk will not only detect and deter this type of activity but mitigate fines and penalties if there is a violation. Being able to show that the effort was made to be in compliance with government regulations can be critical to an organization’s survival.

Discuss how you would develop a compliance program listing the critical elements of your anti-corruption program with brief summary of the purpose of each control

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Accounting Fundamentals Assignment, OUM, Mauritius

ASSIGNMENT

Answer all questions

BAKER has been in business as a retailer. The following balances were extracted from his books on 31 December 2019.

 Rs
Capital 1 July 20197,000
 Inventory, 1 July 20192,644
Freehold Premises6,400
Carriage of Purchases590
 Receivables3,500
 Payables2,300
 Bad Debts are written off896
 Purchases28,485
 Sales39,592
Returns Inwards415
Returns Outwards614
Discount Received412
Wages6,200
Rent and Rates1,000
Lighting114
Insurance452
Cash in Hand63
Cash at Bank841(cr)

Additional information:

  • The closing inventory was valued at Rs2,089
  • Baker has withdrawn cash for his personal use, taking Rs100 from sales every month and this has not been taken into account.
  • Withdrawal of goods worth Rs175 for owner”s use has not been recorded
  • Of the Rs 452 for insurance, Rs 68 was the insurance premium for Baker”s own private residence
  • An amount of Rs37 was owing for lighting

REQUIRED

  • Prepared the income statement for the half-year ending 31 December 2019
  • The Statement of Financial Position as of 31 December 2019
  • Explain with examples the importance of Bank Reconciliation and how a proper Bank Reconciliation can help Management in Decision Making.

(d) Financial accounting rest upon a number of accounting concepts. Briefly explain five of these concepts.

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Critical Thinking I Dialogue Essay Assignment, RU, Canada

ASSIGNMENT

The Dialogues
1. Jim: A mediator should be completely neutral between the two parties in a dispute. If he or she is on the side of either party, the process will be unfair to the other party. In addition, the disadvantaged party will probably detect the lack of neutrality and then the mediation won’t work. Neutrality is probably the most essential of all qualities for a mediator to have. And because the United States is the world’s only superpower, it will never be perceived as neutral. The idea that the United States can go in and mediate in the conflict between Israelis and Palestinians is completely stupid!

Roger: I don’t think so. It’s the one country capable of bringing pressure on both sides, and that’s the most fundamental thing.

2. Steve: I would never let myself be hypnotized by anyone, for any reason.

Peter: Why not?

Steve: Too much is at stake. I just don’t trust anyone that much. When you let somebody hypnotize you, they are getting right inside your mind, and they have a lot of potentials to control you. Hypnosis is dangerous because it opens your mind to too much outside influence.

Peter: I can see what you mean but I don’t know; hypnosis helped me a lot when I was quitting smoking. I used it once for dental work too, and it was great.

3. Nicholas: Legislation compelling children to wear helmets when they are riding their bikes is really a good thing. The latest statistics from the Canadian Institute for Health Information show that hospitalizations due to cycling-related injuries decreased by 12.5 percent between 1997 and ’98 and 2001 and ’02, and during the same period, head injuries decreased by 26 percent.
Helmet laws really work.

Kaitlyn: That’s great news. But I wonder whether these declines are actually the result of the legislation. I mean, it could be that people are cycling less, or that public education campaigns about helmets are helping more than the actual legislation.

Note: The evidence described by Nicholas was publicized in the Globe and Mail for March 26, 2003.

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Advise the Executive team of a Construction and Engineering Firm on risk Matters, Finance Assignment, SUSS, Singapore

ASSIGNMENT

Question 1 You have been hired to advise the executive team of a construction and engineering firm on risk matters. On the first week of work, you had to answer a broad range of questions on risk management. To address those, you had to remember some of the practical lessons from your studies at SUSS.

Mrs. Loo, the Chief Operations Officer, has asked you to prioritize five (5) different risks:

i. A possible billing dispute with a local developer over a serious $ amount

ii. An unlikely accident on one of the sites endangering the lives of the neighbourhood

iii. A routine rise in foreign workers’ wages, which will affect the profit margin by 0.03%

iv. The final adoption of a new law forcing construction firms to contribute 5% of their profit to an environmental preservation fund

v. A projected 50% decline in long-term demand for office space, which represents 90% of the firm’s revenues

a. Analyse the different risks by plotting them on a risk matrix.

Mr. Rao, the Chief Financial Officer, is thinking to hedge the firm’s interest rate risk on the market and would like to understand the workings of forwarding and futures markets.

b. Compare briefly the pros and cons of forwards and futures in risk management terms.

Mrs. Patel, the Chief Communications Officer, has to provide an assessment of the Singapore construction sector risk profile to potential investors coming from Sydney, Australia.

c. Distinguish at least one (1) strength, one (1) weakness, one (1) opportunity and one (1) threat for Singapore construction industry players by using the PESTEL framework.

Question 2

A firm holds a bond with a value of $150 million and an estimated probability of default of 4% over the coming 12 months. The policy of the firm sets its risk limit to 95% VaR (Value at Risk) and 95% ES (expected shortfall) for any individual security. Assume the bond bears no risk of loss due changes in the market price or in the traded value.

(a) Categorise the exact class of risk to which the bond is exposed here.

(b) Compute the 95% VaR measure for this bond and explain your result.

(c) Compute the 95% ES measure for this bond and explain your result.

(d) Assume now that the confidence level is increased to 99% on both limits. Compute the new VaR and ES measures and explain your results.

Question 3

You are reviewing the residential mortgage loan portfolio of a well-known Singapore-based bank. The purpose of your analysis is to establish the capital adequacy of the institution and its ability to withstand a major crisis.

The exposure of the residential mortgage loan portfolio of the bank is reported at $135,000 million. The probability of default over the next year is estimated at 0.5% and the probability of default over the next 15 years is estimated at 4%. The estimated recovery value in case of default is 70% before insurance against default is taken by the lender. 20% of the portfolio is covered by a risk-free insurance firm.

a. Compute the expected loss of the bank’s mortgage portfolio.

The risk-weight of the mortgage portfolio is 20%. Aside from the mortgage portfolio, the bank has $55,000 millions of RWA over its corporate and investment banking business unit and lesser portfolios. The bank common equity is $12 billion. The bank has issued $2 billion in eligible preferred stocks and another $1 billion in contingent convertibles. The bank has finally $5 billion in subordinated debt, half of them qualifying for capital recognition.

b. Compute the % total capital ratio of the bank, differentiate the different tiers and appraise whether the financial institution is adequately capitalised.

You have read about the concept of “Black Swan”. You now wonder if the COVID-19 pandemic could be described as a typical Black Swan event.

c. Indicate the key criteria of a Black Swan event and the differences with those of a known event or an extreme yet plausible event.

d. Demonstrate whether the sudden spread of the COVID-19 pandemic can be defined as a Black Swan event.

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Strategic Analysis of Context Logic. Inc company: Strategic Management Assignment, VU, Canada

ASSIGNMENT

This is a 6-8 page individual strategic analysis of an actual company. Use the outline below to format and structure your paper. Your paper should have a title page and a table of contents. Use 1.5 line spacing, 11 point font. Refer to the course outline and the VIU writing center guidelines for further expected norms.

For this assignment, you select your own company. Go to the IPO Filings list, search through the calendar, and find a company that you want to use for your analysis. https://www.nasdaq.com/market-activity/ipos?tab=filingsIf you click on the company code you see a button for “Financials and Findings. There you will be able to find the most recent B424 filing or the most recent S-1 or S-1A filing. Send the company name and a link to the SEC filing to your instructor for approval. Each student must analyze a company that no other student is using for this assignment. The choice of companies is on a “first-come” basis, pending approval by the instructor.

External Analysis

  • What is the focal firm’s industry?
  • Identify and explain all relevant dominant economic industry characteristics?
  • Analyze Porter’s 5 Forces
    (for each force, give the force strength and identify all relevant reasons for the force strength
  • Identify and explain the primary drivers of competitive dynamics for this industry.
  • Identify all relevant factors that lead to success in this industry.
  • Summarize whether or not you think this is an attractive industry.

Internal Analysis

  • What is the firm’s generic strategy?
  • Identify all of the firm’s (be specific and provide all relevant details)
    1. Key resources
    2. Key capabilities
    3. Core competency
  • Explain whether or not the firm’s core competency gives the company a competitive advantage?
  • What potential ethical issues may arise for this organization? How do you think it may act?

What opportunities or threats exist (at present and in the future) for this organization?

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India’s Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) Policies as a Reason for IKEA’s Slow Progress: Global Business MBA Case Study, CU, Malaysia

QUESTION

The article refers to India’s foreign direct investment (FDI) policies as a reason for IKEA’s slow progress in making its retail presence in the country.  Discuss THREE (3) typical examples of policies that pose as obstacles to inward FDIs.

QUESTION TWO

According to the article, “the formula for success will be to position IKEA in India as a brand that is affordable and aspirational, rather than low-cost.” Evaluate the statement in relation to the prospects and challenges faced by IKEA in its venture into India

IKEA Will Finally Open Its First India Store, But Winning Customers Won’t Be Easy

IKEA has announced that it will open its first store in India in July 2018, in the southern city of Hyderabad.

For the Sweden-based furniture retailer, which ranks 40th on Forbes’ list of the World’s Most Valuable Brands, this first India store will likely signify a major milestone—not only because of the burgeoning potential of the local market but also because IKEA’s plans for India have been in the works for a long time.

Finally happening

IKEA India has actually existed behind the scenes for around 30 years already, sourcing products from India for the company’s stores worldwide. Over the last decade, IKEA has also attempted to establish its retail presence in the country repeatedly.

But from initial obstacles around India’s foreign direct investment policies to the challenge of acquiring large enough swathes of land for their stores in India’s densely populated cities, to having to grow their capacity to make products locally, it has been a slow and demanding process.

Now, everything seems to finally be in place for the world’s largest furniture retailer to expand in the world’s fastest-growing major economy.

A massive, untapped market

India’s furniture sector is still largely fragmented. Most people get their furniture made by neighborhood carpenters or from local furniture stalls that don’t have formal distribution channels, not from large chains or department stores. And while the e-commerce boom has slowly begun changing the way Indians with internet access can shop for furniture, given the sheer size of India’s population, for a brand like IKEA, India still offers a massive opportunity.

“Only 4% of India’s furniture sector is currently ‘organized,’ so we see huge potential in the Indian market,” said Patrik Antoni, IKEA’s deputy country manager for India. “IKEA has already committed Rs. 10,500 crores ($1.54 billion) to India and this figure is set to increase as the brand expands in the country.”

The Hyderabad store will keep with IKEA’s characteristically large warehouse-style stores, at “approximately 400,000 square feet,” with “over 7,500 products” on offer.

“We expect at least 7 million customers to visit the Hyderabad store in a year and overall our goal is to reach to 200 million customers in three years in India,” Antoni said. After the first store opens in Hyderabad, several more openings will follow, he said, starting with their other “priority markets:” Mumbai, Delhi, and Bengaluru.

According to analysts like Nirmalya Kumar, Lee Kong Chian Professor of Marketing at Singapore Management University, and a leading thinker and author on marketing and strategy in India, IKEA has good reason to be so bullish on the country, especially in the long run.

“When a big western brand like IKEA comes to India, it can’t be worried about breaking even in the first few years,” Kumar said. “They’re looking at being a massive business in India even two hundred years from now; and given the sheer size of the population, in the long term, India will definitely be huge for IKEA.”

Not without challenges

Still, the opportunity that the Indian market brings will not be without its challenges. According to Antoni, IKEA’s biggest challenge in India is “intense low-cost competition.” But it’s a challenge that IKEA knows all too well, thanks to its forays into China which required the retailer to slash prices and increase local sourcing to remain competitive.

In order to get the price-value equation right in India, the brand appears to have learned its lessons, adopting low price points from the outset.

“Our range will have 500 products below Rs. 100 ($2) and 1000 products below Rs. 200 ($4) from the start,” Antoni said. “We need to strike a balance between quality and price and this will be a change-driver for us.”

According to Prof. Kumar, the other more troublesome challenges for IKEA in India going forward will be “finding enough good locations at affordable prices” and “getting through the bureaucracy.”

“It’s incredibly hard to find large locations at attractive prices in Indian cities, and the Indian government’s approach policy-wise has always been to protect the interests of Indian companies rather than to provide the Indian consumer with maximum choice, which can be a stifling environment to work in for foreign companies,” Kumar said.

“But IKEA has the staying power. And they know India is big. Which other country would you wait for more than twenty years to enter?”

Adding local relevance

While the idea is to bring the international IKEA experience to India, Antoni says that it will also localize some of its products to appeal specifically to the Indian consumer, with the help of insights gleaned from over 1,000 visits to Indian homes by the retailer’s market research team.

One example is mattresses with a coconut layer. Coconut fiber is commonly used as a mattress filling in India because it’s a material that keeps cool–a big plus during hot summers. Antoni also said that common Indian kitchen items such as “masala boxes, idli makers, pressure cookers, and tawas” will be offered at all their India stores.

Additionally, IKEA plans on sourcing and making more of its products in India. While most IKEA products are designed in Sweden, manufacturing has been long been outsourced to China and other Asian countries. Approximately €315 million (roughly $366 million) worth of products are already sourced from India every year for IKEA’s stores worldwide, and this number is expected to grow in the future. Sourcing locally would allow for lower distribution costs and bigger profit margins.

“The formula for success will be to position IKEA in India as a brand that is affordable and aspirational, rather than low-cost,” said Kumar. “Focus entirely on upper-middle-class young people with an aspiration for western design. Millennials will be IKEA’s most enthusiastic customers in India.”

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Ethos of Public Administration Assignment, NMU, South Africa

ASSIGNMENT

Direct quotation:

“To delegate is to entrust to another the execution of some power or duty vested in oneself….” (Gildenhuys1997: 73).

Or

Gildenhuys (1997: 73) contends that “To delegate is to entrust to another the execution of some power or duty vested in oneself….”

Partial quotation:

According to Caiden (1982:6), public administration refers to the implementation of pronouncements made by ….

Or

Gildenhuys (1997:73) maintains that delegation is to entrust to another the execution of some power or duty bested in oneself.

Or

Delegation is assigning one’s duties and responsibilities to another (Gildenhuys 1997:73)

Sources with two authors:

Direct quotation:

“Public Administration as an academic field of study, then, is far from a settled discipline” (Gordon &Milakovich 1995:23).

Or

According to Gordon and  Milakovich (1995:23) “Public Administration as an academic field of study, then, is far from a settled discipline” .

Partial quotation:

Gordon and Milakovich (1995:23) argue that Public Administration as an academic field of study is far from being a developed discipline.

Sources with more than two authors:

Direct quotation:

The format is the same as the source with two sources.  Write all authors of the book (excluding the initials) in the first text referencing and can use the abbreviation (et al.) in the subsequent referencing:

“All these values have important implications for public resources management” (Schwella, et al. 1996:15).

Or

Schnelle, et al. (1996:15) “All these values have important implications for public resources management”.

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Theoretical and Clinical Perspectives in Speech and Language Development

ASSIGNMENT

Consonant inventory
Total consonant inventory expected for Australian English (Cox & Fletcher, 2017): /p, b, m, f, v, t, d, n, θ, ð, s, z, ɹ, l, w, k, ɡ, ŋ, h, tʃ, dʒ, ʃ, ʒ, j/

Inventory constraints (phones not in inventory; note which phones have not been elicited)

  • In the inventory: p, b, m, f, t, d, n, l, w, k, ŋ, h, j.
  • Not observed anywhere: v, θ, ð, s, z, ɹ, ɡ, tʃ, dʒ, ʃ, ʒ.
  • Not observed, despite elicitation: v, θ, s, z, ɹ, ɡ, tʃ, dʒ, ʃ
  • (See: v (van), θ (thumb, path), s (sock), z (nose), ɡ (gone), ɹ (bridge, train, crab), ʃ (fish, splash), tʃ (chair, watch), dʒ (jam, bridge))
  • Not observed, and not elicited: ð, ʒ
  • Positional constraints (positions phones limited to):
  • Phones that appear in all positions: b, m, t, d, n.
  • Phones restricted to Syllable Onset – Word initial: f, w, j, k, (h)
  • Phones restricted to Syllable Coda – Word Final: p, l, (ŋ)

Sequence constraints (e.g., : only CVCV and CCV; clusters limited to…):
The best way of writing the sequence constraints:
▪ C(w)V(C)(t)
Alternative 1:
▪ C(C)V(C)(C)
▪ Onset clusters are restricted to [Cw] / a consonant followed by [w]
▪ Coda clusters are restricted to [Ct] / a consonant followed by [t]
Alternative 2:
▪ C1-2VC0-2
▪ Onset clusters are restricted to [Cw] / a consonant followed by [w]
▪ Coda clusters are restricted to [Ct] / a consonant followed by [t]
▪ C(w)V(C)(t)

b. Vowel inventory
Total vowel inventory expected (identify the transcription convention used in each data sample you are provided with; Cox & Fletcher, 2017):

Circle vowels within the client’s phonetic inventory.
o Not observed AND not elicited: oɪ, ɪə
o All other vowels would thus have been circled

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Assignment 2: Case Report. Speech Assessment Data

Assessment Summary

George was shown a series of pictures and asked to name them. The results from this assessment are presented here.

Target WordTarget IPAChild IPA
1Cupk ɐ pt ɐ p
2Goneɡ ɔ nd ɔ n
3Knifen ɑe fn ɑe t
4Sharpʃ ɐː pd ɐː t
5Fishf ɪ ʃd ɪ t
6Kissk ɪ sk ɪ t
7Socks ɔ kd ɔ k t
8Glass(not attempted)(not attempted)
9Watchw ɔ tʃw ɔ t
10Nosen əʉ zn əʉ t
11Mouthm æɔ θm æɔ t
12Yawnj oː nj oː n
13Leafl iː fj iː t
14Thumbθ ɐ md ɐ m
15Footf ʊ td ʊ t
16Toet əʉt əʉ d
17Snakesn æɪ kn æɪ t
18Vanv æ nw æ n
19Fastf ɐː stf ɐː t
20Girlɡ ɜː ld ɜː l
21Stairsst eː zd eː t
22Bigb ɪ ɡb ɪ d
23Jamdʒ æ md æ m
24Househ æɔ sh æɔ t
25Pathp ɐː θb ɐ t
26Doord oːd oː
27Smokesm əʉ kd əʉ t
28Bridgebɹ ɪ dʒbw ɪ t
29Traintɹ æɪ ntw æɪ n
31Chairtʃ eːd eː
32Redɹ e dw eː d
33Spoonsp ʉː nb ʉː n
34Planepl æɪ nb æɪ n
35Flyfl ɑed æ
36Skysk ɑed æ
37Suns ɐ nd ɐ n
38Wingw ɪ ŋw ɪ ŋ
39splashspl æ ʃj æ t
40Tentt e ntt e nt
41Salts ɔ l td ɔ l t
42Crabkɹ æ bkw æ b
43Sweetsw iː tsw iː t
44Sleevesl iː vd iː d
45Zipperz ɪ p əd iː p

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