400 words. Due: Tuesday, June 8. Write a memo describing the best things about

400 words. Due: Tuesday, June 8. Write a memo describing the best things about the way the student(s) in each of the videos answered the questions, including the nonverbal communication, eye contact, posture, movement, clothing, facial expression. Give specific details from each video.
Video Resources | Fisher College of Business (osu.edu):
https://fisher.osu.edu/careers-recruiting/students/undergraduate-students/video-resources

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Week 3: Patient support and advocacy

Week 3: Patient support and advocacy:
Please watch those lectures and answer those questions:
Lecture 1:

Lecture 2

Lecture 3
Extra information for digital health tracking plan (Rerecording video Lecter 3)
https://waikato.au.panopto.com/Panopto/Pages/Viewer.aspx?id=d5d08002-ce73-4da9-a38a-acec00282456
– first: Discuss the following questions: 100 words
-What impact has Web 2.0 had on the lives of people living with serious, chronic illnesses? 50 words
-How might sites like Patients Like Me differ from blogs, Facebook groups and Instagram #’s? 50 words
– Second: In your groups, have a go at discussing the following questions without referring to google. Do feel free to check answers online once you have posted: 50 words
-What is science?
-How is scientific knowledge produced?
-How does something shift from being an idea or theory to being a fact?
Third: in your groups, discuss the following:
-We rely on technologies developed through scientific research in everyday life (e.g., computers, cell phones, cars) – but to what extent do you think daily life is informed by science in both the general population and your own living?
You might consider: 50 words
Diet
Exercise
Clothing
Transport
Housing
Values and beliefs
Judging right from wrong
– Forth: It seems reasonably clear that anti-science groups have used Web 2.0 more effectively than pro-science groups.
Moreover, algorithms appear to have promoted their material effectively
Now moves are occurring to adapt algorithms in social media to make harmful groups (such as anti-vaccination groups) harder to find.
Discuss with your group the following: To what extent are attempts to control the messages of these groups on social media an infringement of freedom of expression (a fundamental human right)?

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Stage-Based Challenges and Strategies for Support in Doctoral Education: A Practical Guide for Students, Faculty Members, and Administrators

Prompt: In the article “Stage-Based Challenges and Strategies for Support in Doctoral Education: A Practical Guide for Students, Faculty Members, and Administrators,” Pifer and Baker (2016) identified three stages of doctoral education, explaining each one and suggesting strategies to overcome challenges that arise in each stage. The excerpted reading below includes the explanations and strategies aimed at doctoral students in the first two stages of doctoral education: knowledge consumption and knowledge creation. Read through these paragraphs from Pifer and Baker (2016), and then compose an essay in response to these questions:
Based on the challenges and strategies discussed by Pifer and Baker (2016), what challenges do you anticipate you will face in your doctoral program?
What strategies will you apply to work through these challenges in your doctoral journey?
In your essay, include relevant paraphrased and cited information from this reading excerpt:
Stage 1: Knowledge Consumption
In the first stage of doctoral education, the admission process through the first year of coursework, students begin to cultivate their identities as doctoral-level learners. The early stage of the doctoral journey may include a rough transition into the learner role. This initial transition may bring challenges related to identity shifts from professional to student, changes in geographic locations, and generally adjusting to their new roles as nascent disciplinary members (Gardner, 2009b; Sweitzer, 2009; Vekkaila, Pyhältö, & Lonka, 2013). At this stage, students with career experience shed their prior professional identities. This may present a challenge as students do away with, or put on hold, hard-earned status and expertise and assume the identity of the novice and the new entrant into departmental, institutional, and disciplinary cultures (J. Austin et al., 2009; Gardner, 2009b; Sweitzer, 2009). In addition, the magnitude of the scholarly pursuit may come with feelings of fear, doubt, and isolation (Brill, Balcanoff, Land, Gogarty, & Turner, 2014), in addition to exhaustion, cynicism, and inefficiency (Vekkaila et al., 2013).
Also at this time, students learn the sociocultural norms and expectations of their fields, as well as the requirements and structural guidelines of their programs. First-year coursework provides foundational content knowledge, and communicates faculty expectations for student engagement and performance. Students engage in the traditional approach to learning, whereby the professor imparts foundational knowledge through classroom instruction. Acquiring this knowledge is the first step towards legitimacy in their chosen fields. Curricular expectations and disciplinary knowledge norms as communicated through coursework may challenge students considerably (Gardner, 2009b).
Stage 1 strategies for students
We suggest that students conduct a needs assessment to identify the areas for which they need support, as well as the types of relationships that can provide that support (Baker, Pifer, & Griffin, 2014; Martinsuo & Turkulainen, 2011). This process, once implemented, can be repeated as needed across the stages of students’ doctoral programs. This is an important stage to establish the advising, mentoring, and peer support relationships that will be instrumental throughout the doctoral journey (J. Austin et al., 2009; Baker & Pifer, 2011; Stubb, Pyhältö, & Lonka, 2014). Students and their doctoral supervisors don’t always share perceptions and expectations of their own and each other’s roles (Holbrook et al., 2014; Wade-Benzoni, Rousseau, & Li, 2006; Woolderink, Putnik, van der Boom, & Klabbers, 2015); taking the initiative to inquire with their supervisors at this stage of the journey may help establish a shared understanding that reduces ambiguity and provides structure to that key relationship (Main, 2014). Additionally, this is a good time for students to become familiar with key disciplinary associations as they seek to become familiar with disciplinary norms and cross-institutional networks. Early participation in disciplinary meetings will also allow students to begin creating and cultivating their developmental networks, which will help combat the isolation that accompanies Stage 2 and will facilitate the research and job search tasks in Stage 3 (Adegbola, 2014; Sweitzer, 2009; Yerkes, Van de Schoot, & Sonneveld, 2012).
Stage 2: Knowledge Creation
Stage 2 includes the completion of coursework, candidacy exams, and the dissertation proposal development and defense. Such significant tasks can bring with them equally significant fears, concerns, and self-doubt. Research has revealed the potential difficulty in transitioning to independence as students engage in the development of their scholarly identities, professional skills, and research agendas (Baker, Pifer, & Flemion, 2013; Gardner, 2009b; Lovitts, 2005; Walker et al., 2008). This can be an isolating time, yet research suggests that academic integration is critical for persistence (Golde, 2000, 2005). There is often no precedent for the type of activity and responsibilities students encounter in Stage 2 as they move away from the structure provided by courses. No longer prompted by responsibilities such as attending class or collaborating on assignments, interactions with faculty and fellow students can become infrequent. Students’ relationships, both within and outside the academic program, must evolve to accommodate this transition. Work with faculty members shifts during this stage from structured dialogues in the classroom to the unstructured nature of collaboration and supervision that occurs in research projects, writing, and dissertation work. Interactions with family and friends can also become strained or less frequent if time for personal relationships is sacrificed for research and writing (Baker & Pifer, 2011; Gardner & Gopaul, 2012).
Stage 2 strategies for students
The pressure to develop professionally, while still completing their training in the new autonomy of Stage 2, can be overwhelming. Recognizing and understanding this stage can help students manage its challenges effectively. It is normal to feel uneasy with the rapid, ill defined, and sometimes confusing transition from coursework to independent scholarship. Stage 2 is a useful time for applying prior learning to the construction of their own scholarship, research agendas, expertise, and professional identities (Baker, Pifer, & Flemion, 2013). It is important for students to be proactive about communicating in both personal and professional relationships during Stage 2. One of the most important relationships is that with the advisor or dissertation chair (Barnes & Austin, 2009; Gardner, 2008; McAlpine & Amundsen, 2012). Students who are able to let their advisors know what they expect from those relationships, and who give their advisors the chance to express their style or expectations, may find it easier to approach difficult conversations or to address challenges that may arise. We encourage conducting a needs assessment with the advisor/supervisor as a way to establish expectations and goals for the working relationship moving forward (Baker, Pifer, & Griffin, 2014; Vaquera, 2007). As students balance teaching, research, publishing, and the other facets of doctoral training, talking about these experiences with peers and faculty members becomes important and can ease the stress associated with maintaining a careful balance between personal and professional responsibilities during the transitions of Stage 2 (Fenge, 2012; Jairam & Kahl, 2012; McDaniels, 2010; Pearson, Cumming, Evans, Macauley, & Ryland, 2011). Fellow students can provide formal support such as writing groups as well as informal support and friendship (Aitchison, 2009; Martinsuo & Turkulainen, 2011; Pilbeam, LloydJones, & Denyer, 2013).
The reading above is excerpted from the following article:
Pifer, M. J. & Baker, V. L. (2016). Stage-based challenges and strategies for support in doctoral education: A practical guide for students, faculty members, and program administrators. International Journal of Doctoral Studies, 11, 15-34. https://doi.org/10.28945/2347
Stage-based Challenges and Strategies for Support in Doctoral Education: A Practical Guide for Students, Faculty Members, and Program Administrators, by Pifer, M. J. & Baker, V. L., in International Journal of Doctoral Studies, Vol. 11. Copyright 2016 by Informing Science Institute. Reprinted by permission of Informing Science Institute via the Copyright Clearance Center.
Prompt: Based on the challenges and strategies discussed by Pifer and Baker (2016), what challenges do you anticipate you will face in your doctoral program? What strategies will you apply to work through these challenges in your doctoral journey?
By Day 7 (Sunday) of Week 2 at 11:59 pm MST (please adjust this time to your current time zone)
Write a 1-2-page, double-spaced essay in response to the prompt above. To present your strongest writing skills, submit an essay that:
Provides a focused and clear central idea that responds to both questions in the assignment prompt with developed ideas;
Integrates relevant and accurate paraphrased and/or quoted evidence from the provided reading in support of the argument, accompanied by appropriate analysis and some form of citation and/or attribution to signal when information is used from the reading;
Organizes ideas with logical structure, clear paragraphs, and transitional words/phrases;
Uses grammar and mechanics to effectively communicate meaning to readers;
Maintains academic integrity by demonstrating your original work and appropriately paraphrasing and citing relevant information from the Pifer and Baker (2016) reading excerpt. Including outside sources beyond the Pifer and Baker (2016) reading excerpt provided above is not required for this essay; if you use them, however, then you must cite any information you summarize, paraphrase, or quote.
For additional tips as you draft and revise your essay, visit the Doctoral Writing Assessment website and the Writing Center website. Note, however, that this assignment is not eligible for the Writing Center’s paper review service.
Please do not write your name on your essay. Instead, save your document in accordance with the directions that follow.

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Every Woman Needed a Husband, even if he did Silence the Song in Her

The novel begins by issuing a kind of challenge – Rahim Khan’s promise to Amir that there is a way to be good again, to recover from his double betrayal of his best friend and half-brother, Hassan, and morally rehabilitate himself. The same question operating at the personal level applies in this book at the social one – how can a society become good again? If the Afghanistan of the early part of the book is peaceful and nurturing for privileged children such as Amir, we have ample opportunities to discern the society’s shortcomings. We know that Hassan, for example, was born to be illiterate. Or that Jamila Teheri believes “Every woman needed a husband, even if he did silence the song in her.” At the conclusion of this novel, a natural question to ask is: Has Rahim’s promise been redeemed, at either the personal or societal level? What are Amir’s prospects for being good again? Or Afghanistan’s? Or any of us?
Directions: Develop a thoughtful, coherent, and well-written response. Be sure you “take a position” and state it in a clear, specific thesis (claim.)
Requirements:
Use proper MLA format.
*4 – 5 paragraphs, 1 1/2 – 2 pages in length.
*Use 3 – 4 specific examples from the text. These do not have to be quotations, but they must include specific details to support your position.
*** if the source could include direct quotes from the novel that would be great!

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She’s Beautiful When She’s Angry

This is my history class final exam essay assignment, this is the guideline of the professor provided for this assignment, i will provided the two documents necessary to write this essay.
Guidelines:
Minimum 2 pages typed.
Double space
Cite your paper – you may use MLA or Chicago style format.
Use the following two documents and the film “She’s Beautiful When She’s Angry” to write an essay on the prompt provided below.
Document 3 Betty Freidan reveals “The Problem that Has No Name” p. 476
(Please note that this document is a few pages of Betty Freidan’s book The Feminist Mystique)
Document 9 Phyllis Schlafly declares “Women’s Libbers Do Not Speak for Us” p. 488
Essay Prompt
Describe what “problem” Betty Friedan exposes and give a clear explanation of why so many women are suffering from it. Explain how it leads to women rebelling and then use Phyllis Schlafly’s “Women Libbers Do Not Speak for Us” to explain how Schlafly argues against women’s liberation.
**You must do more than summarize the readings. Your answer should demonstrate critical thinking and analysis.
Here is the link for the video professor told us to use for the essay:
LINK: https://youtu.be/Zq3wYppj804

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write a business paper for the technology leaders of a large organization that evaluates and categorizes global threats

For this assignment, you must write a business paper for the technology leaders of a large organization that evaluates and categorizes global threats.
Your paper should include:
Overview of the organization and critical infrastructure
Evaluation of the threat of at least two terrorist organizations and three nation-state actors.
List of specific threats and potential impact on the organization or critical infrastructure
Information about the targets, industries, and populations that might be affected by the threat sources.
Length: 6-8 pages, not including title and reference pages

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Imagine that after exploring online job postings, you submitted an application and resume to Atha Corp for a management position

I WILL ATTACH THE WORKSHEET. here is the full instructions/details:
Scenario
Imagine that after exploring online job postings, you submitted an application and resume to Atha Corp for a management position. Atha markets its product—unique lighting products (wall, pendant, floor, table, and nightlights)—through a series of regional distributors and directly online.
A short time later you received the following e-mail.
Atha Corporation HR E-mail
Dear Applicant,
Thank you for your interest in employment at Atha. We have received your application packet. The next step for candidates is to provide a narrative response to the questions in the attached document. Please return your completed document to me.
Once we receive your responses, we will review them and notify you of the next steps.
Good luck!
Sincerely,
Thomas Hardy
Human Resources Recruiter
Atha Corporation
Instructions
Respond to the scenario by completing the Atha Application Questionnaire [DOCX].
Additional Requirements
Your assessment should also meet the following requirements:
Format: Use the Atha Application Questionnaire document to complete this assessment.
Length: 3-4 pages, double-space lines.
Written communication:
Express your main points, arguments, and conclusions coherently.
Use correct grammar and mechanics.
Proofread your writing.

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Ragtime Slim Lambert version 2 corrected

The instructions are in the document Culture 3 VT 2021 at “Part 2, Individual Assignment: ………”. Attached is a version of the essay that received a very poor rating. I think you should start from scratch but it could be an indication of expectations: the document called “Ragtime Slim Lambert version 2 corrected”. Expectations are detailed in the document “Academic writing culture, Intext citation and MLA styleguide”. A great deal of importance will be accorded to the following: Start with a thesis statement i.e. something you want to argue for and that is not so obvious i.e. one could not agreed with it; Have transitions between arguments and thus paragraphs; There are transitions between paragraphs and arguments. Be hyper vigilant that everything has a reference connected to it (even what could the most obvious common sense claim to be supported by a clear hyper reference); As for the introduction, please use the Funnel technique.

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The idea is to use the critical “lens” to examine your subject

Write an essay in which you use a concept from one of the essays we have read (Twain, Plato, Machiavelli, Ericsson, or Orwell) as a “lens,” or frame, to analyze a work of narrative art that interests you. It could be a movie, TV show, short story, novel, podcast, etc. Whatever interests you.
The idea is to use the critical “lens” to examine your subject. Attempt to engage/converse with said author and their theory in a way that provides deeper insight into the subject matter of your choice.
Example: As an example, a lens essay might look at the popular TV show Game of Thrones though the lens of Machiavelli’s claim that it is better for rulers to be feared than loved. The thesis statement might be: “In the acclaimed television show Game of Thrones, the rulers of Westeros who follow Machiavelli’s principle that is better to be feared than loved are the most successful.”
I will go over the lens essay format more in class, and you can find information on this type of essay online. This is a good quick guide (Links to an external site.).
Notes:
Pick a concept from one of the non-fiction essays we read as your lens. Either Twain, Plato, Machiavelli, Ericsson, or Orwell.
Your subject may be one of the short stories we have read in class (Grace Paley, N.K. Jemisin, Ursula K. Le Guin, etc.). But you are free to pick a movie, TV show, documentary, or any other work of your choosing.
Remember to use APA formatting, including a title page and reference page.
Double space your work, use 12 point font, and indent paragraphs.

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Describe the Debate Process used in Congress Today

Describe the debate process used in Congress today. Describe any formal debate you may have been involved in, in the past. What were its outcomes? What were some of the obstacles you faced? Was the debate an effective method of communicating and idea sharing? What could have happened differently to stimulate further idea sharing?
Use C-Span and CNN to view House and Senate Debates. Have the debate rules changed in the House and Senate? If so when and why?
Based on the methods used in Congress today and your past experiences, how would you like this course’s weekly debates to proceed? List the ground rules that should be set for the weekly debate.
Finally, what are some important current issues that would be worthwhile to discuss? How can the outcomes of these issues affect the constituents in your local area?
My area is NC. Cite any sources using the APA format on a separate page.

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