1. Introduction (about 1/2 double-spaced page), including your thesis in bold pr

1. Introduction (about 1/2 double-spaced page), including your thesis in bold print.
2. In about 1/2 double-spaced page, describe your favorite dish, using clear and specific details. What are the ingredients?
3. In about 3 double-spaced pages, trace the three primary ingredients of your meal to their origins. To the best of your ability, trace every creator, nation, and job involved in getting the food to you. Consider the roles of, among others,
farmers
farm workers
cooks
packing and packaging workers
slaughterhouse workers
grocery store workers
food transport workers
government bureaucrats/politicians (who make food rules/regulations)
and so on.
You will certainly do deep research using the internet, but you may also need to make phone calls to determine the origins of the ingredients of your meal. Part of these 3 pages should be a 1/2 page description of your research process; how did you learn this information?
4. In about 5 double-spaced pages, using course readings and materials, explore at least four dimensions of the ways that food connects you with others.
Two of these four dimensions must be 1) the industrial food system and 2) the use of non-human animals.
For the other two (or more) dimensions, you could consider:
food as an expression of your culture (or subculture)
food as counterculture
food as an expression of gender
food work(ers)
the moral status and implications of food
food and social class
ways to build a better, more just food system
or…?
5. In about 1/2 page, your conclusion.
_____________________________________________________________________________
These four readings must be deeply used:
Pollan, Michael (2007). The Omnivore’s Dilemma. New York, NY: Penguin Books.
Foer, Jonathan Safran (2009). Eating Animals. New York, NY: Little, Brown.
Schlosser, Eric (2005). Fast Food Nation. New York, NY: HarperPerennial.
Petrini, Carlo (2005). Slow Food Nation: Why Our Food Should Be Good, Clean, And Fair. New York, NY: Rizzoli Ex Libris.
These are all of the other academic readings for our class; use at least 2 of these, in addition to the above 4 sources:
Clark, Dylan. The Raw and the Rotten: Punk Cuisine. In Counihan, Carole & Penny Van Esterik (Eds.) (2008), Food and Culture: A Reader (pp. 411-422). New York, NY: Routledge.
Watson, James L. China’s Big Mac Attack. In Watson, James L. & Caldwell, Melissa L. (Eds.) (2005), The Cultural Politics of Food and Eating (pp. 70-79). Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing.
Schivelbusch, Wolfgang (1993). Tastes of Paradise. New York, NY: Vintage Books.
Roseberry, William. The Rise of Yuppie Coffees and the Reimagination of Class in the United
States. In Counihan, Carole & Penny Van Esterik (Eds.) (2008), Food and Culture: A Reader (pp. 122-143). New York, NY: Routledge.
Belasco, Warren. Food and the Counterculture: A Story of Bread and Politics . In Counihan, Carole & Penny Van Esterik (Eds.) (2008). Food and Culture: A Reader (pp. 217- 234). New York, NY: Routledge.
Johnston, Josée & Baumann, Shyon (2010). Chapter 4, “Foodie Politics” . Foodies (pp. 112-151). New York, NY: Routledge.
Brumberg, Joan Jacobs. The Appetite as Voice. In Watson, James L. & Caldwell, Melissa L. (Eds.) (2005). The Cultural Politics of Food and Eating (pp. 141-161). Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing.
Bordo, Susan. Anorexia Nervosa: Psychopathology as the Crystallization of Culture. In Watson, James L. & Caldwell, Melissa L. (Eds.) (2005). The Cultural Politics of Food and Eating (pp. 162-186). Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing.
Quammen, David (2000). Who Swims with The Tuna. The Boilerplate Rhino: Nature in The Eye of The Beholder (pp. 65- 71). New York, NY: Scribner.

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount